Knowledge from Olle Garden Bed: A Complete Guide To Planting Tarragon – Ollegardens website

Knowledge from Olle Garden Bed: A Complete Guide To Planting Tarragon

Artemisia dracunculus is a cold resistant perennial herb, which may not be the staple food in the kitchen - but it should be. Planting tarragon is not only one of the easier gardening challenges you can take on, but also has many uses, from kitchen to medicine cabinet. The following content also has some reference value for raised garden beds.

It is famous as an ingredient of Dutch sauce and Beianae sauce. The mild and slightly fennel flavor of tarragon leaves will make your recipe even better. It goes well with fish, cheese and egg dishes. Artemisia dracunculus also adds good taste to vegetables such as beans or spinach. The sweet smell is reminiscent of fresh cut hay.

Artemisia dracunculus is called "little dragon" because of its Latin name Medina dragon. The name is believed to come from the shape of the root of Artemisia dracunculus, which is intertwined like a sleeping snake. Artemisia dracunculus is one of the herbs used in Hippocrates and is very common in medieval gardens.

This article will introduce you to planting tarragon and all the reasons why you should not wait to plant it in the herb garden.

raised garden bed

Artemisia dracunculus

There are two different types of tarragon. The popular cooking herb is called German or French tarragon. On the other hand, Russian tarragon is not so delicious, but it is a beautiful supplement to the garden.

German and French Artemisia dracunculus

This is the cooking variety used in cooking. Usually, it is called French, but you may also see it called German tarragon. This variety can only grow from cuttings.

If your goal is to use tarragon to make delicious dishes, then this is the right variety for you. French tarragon contains a high level of essential oil, which makes it smell and taste great.

Russian (Artemisia annua)

The leaves of Russian Artemisia dracunculus are coarser and taste less than those of French Artemisia dracunculus. I heard that people say it tastes like grass, which is why many chefs think Russian varieties are not qualified in the kitchen.

Planting tarragon: A complete guide to planting, growing, and harvesting tarragon

Printed by May Vanario

Artemisia dracunculus is a cold resistant perennial herb, which may not be the staple food in the kitchen - but it should be. Planting tarragon is not only one of the easier gardening challenges you can take on, but also has many uses, from kitchen to medicine cabinet.

It is famous as an ingredient of Dutch sauce and Beianae sauce. The mild and slightly fennel flavor of tarragon leaves will make your recipe even better. It goes well with fish, cheese and egg dishes. Artemisia dracunculus also adds good taste to vegetables such as beans or spinach. The sweet smell is reminiscent of fresh cut hay.

raised garden bed

Artemisia dracunculus is called "little dragon" because of its Latin name Medina dragon. The name is believed to come from the shape of the root of Artemisia dracunculus, which is intertwined like a sleeping snake. Artemisia dracunculus is one of the herbs used in Hippocrates, which is very common in medieval gardens.

This video cannot be played because of a technical error. (Error code: 102006)

This article will introduce you to planting tarragon and all the reasons why you should not wait to plant it in the herb garden.

Artemisia dracunculus

There are two different types of tarragon. The popular cooking herb is called German or French tarragon. On the other hand, Russian tarragon is not so delicious, but it is a beautiful supplement to the garden.

German and French Artemisia dracunculus

This is the cooking variety used in cooking. Usually, it is called French, but you may also see it called German tarragon. This variety can only grow from cuttings.

If your goal is to use tarragon to make delicious dishes, then this is the right variety for you. French tarragon contains a high level of essential oil, which makes it smell and taste great.

Russian (Artemisia annua)

The leaves of Russian Artemisia dracunculus are coarser and taste less than those of French Artemisia dracunculus. I heard that people say it tastes like grass, which is why many chefs think Russian varieties are not qualified in the kitchen.

On the plus side, it does produce seeds and is easier to reproduce. Russian varieties can be used for medicine. The leaves are light green, with sharp spines and thinner than its popular stepsister Artemisia dracunculus, but it is still a good visual supplement to the vanilla garden.

Mexican tarragon (Tagetes Lucida)

raised garden bed

Mexican tarragon is part of the marigold family. It is a perennial plant deep in the south, and some people use it as a substitute for the French variety.

Planting Artemisia scoparia

Planting tarragon: A complete guide to planting, growing, and harvesting tarragon

Printed by May Vanario

Artemisia dracunculus is a cold resistant perennial herb, which may not be the staple food in the kitchen - but it should be. Planting tarragon is not only one of the easier gardening challenges you can take on, but also has many uses, from kitchen to medicine cabinet.

It is famous as an ingredient of Dutch sauce and Beianae sauce. The mild and slightly fennel flavor of tarragon leaves will make your recipe even better. It goes well with fish, cheese and egg dishes. Artemisia dracunculus also adds good taste to vegetables such as beans or spinach. The sweet smell is reminiscent of fresh cut hay.

Artemisia dracunculus is called "little dragon" because of its Latin name Medina dragon. The name is believed to come from the shape of the root of Artemisia dracunculus, which is intertwined like a sleeping snake. Artemisia dracunculus is one of the herbs used in Hippocrates and is very common in medieval gardens.

This video cannot be played because of a technical error. (Error code: 102006)

This article will introduce you to planting tarragon and all the reasons why you should not wait to plant it in the herb garden.

Artemisia dracunculus

There are two different types of tarragon. The popular cooking herb is called German or French tarragon. On the other hand, Russian tarragon is not so delicious, but it is a beautiful supplement to the garden.

German and French Artemisia dracunculus

This is the cooking variety used in cooking. Usually, it is called French, but you may also see it called German tarragon. This variety can only grow from cuttings.

If your goal is to use tarragon to make delicious dishes, then this is the right variety for you. French tarragon contains a high level of essential oil, which makes it smell and taste great.

raised garden bed

Russian (Artemisia annua)

The leaves of Russian Artemisia dracunculus are coarser and taste less than those of French Artemisia dracunculus. I heard that people say it tastes like grass, which is why many chefs think Russian varieties are not qualified in the kitchen.

On the plus side, it does produce seeds and is easier to reproduce. Russian varieties can be used for medicine. The leaves are light green, with sharp spines and thinner than its popular stepsister Artemisia dracunculus, but it is still a good visual supplement to the vanilla garden.

Mexican tarragon (Tagetes Lucida)

By Dick Calbert from Gibsons, British Columbia, Canada - Tagetes Lucida, sweet marigold, CCBY2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=34450923

Mexican tarragon is part of the marigold family. It is a perennial plant deep in the south, and some people use it as a substitute for the French variety.

Planting Artemisia scoparia

Through the forest&Kim Starr, CCBY3.0, we, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=71490446

Longhao is best grown from cuttings. You can also buy plants in your local nursery.

Soil requirements

Artemisia dracunculus is best grown in loamy soil rich in compost, with pH value of 6.3-7.5. It doesn't like thick soil, so if you have thick clay, please add sand and rotten feces. If you have sandy soil, add compost to improve the texture. Artemisia dracunculus needs well drained land.

Planting tarragon: A complete guide to planting, growing, and harvesting tarragon

Printed by May Vanario

Artemisia dracunculus is a cold resistant perennial herb, which may not be the staple food in the kitchen - but it should be. Planting tarragon is not only one of the easier gardening challenges you can take on, but also has many uses, from kitchen to medicine cabinet.

It is famous as an ingredient of Dutch sauce and Beianae sauce. The mild and slightly fennel flavor of tarragon leaves will make your recipe even better. It goes well with fish, cheese and egg dishes. Artemisia dracunculus also adds good taste to vegetables such as beans or spinach. The sweet smell is reminiscent of fresh cut hay.

Artemisia dracunculus is called "little dragon" because of its Latin name Medina dragon. The name is believed to come from the shape of the root of Artemisia dracunculus, which is intertwined like a sleeping snake. Artemisia dracunculus is one of the herbs used in Hippocrates and is very common in medieval gardens.

This video cannot be played because of a technical error. (Error code: 102006)

This article will introduce you to planting tarragon and all the reasons why you should not wait to plant it in the herb garden.

Artemisia dracunculus

There are two different types of tarragon. The popular cooking herb is called German or French tarragon. On the other hand, Russian tarragon is not so delicious, but it is a beautiful supplement to the garden.

raised garden bed

German and French Artemisia dracunculus

This is the cooking variety used in cooking. Usually, it is called French, but you may also see it called German tarragon. This variety can only grow from cuttings.

If your goal is to use tarragon to make delicious dishes, then this is the right variety for you. French tarragon contains a high level of essential oil, which makes it smell and taste great.

Russian (Artemisia annua)

The leaves of Russian Artemisia dracunculus are coarser and taste less than those of French Artemisia dracunculus. I heard that people say it tastes like grass, which is why many chefs think Russian varieties are not qualified in the kitchen.

On the plus side, it does produce seeds and is easier to reproduce. Russian varieties can be used for medicine. The leaves are light green, with sharp spines and thinner than its popular stepsister Artemisia dracunculus, but it is still a good visual supplement to the vanilla garden.

Mexican tarragon (Tagetes Lucida)

By Dick Calbert from Gibsons, British Columbia, Canada - Tagetes Lucida, sweet marigold, CCBY2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=34450923

Mexican tarragon is part of the marigold family. It is a perennial plant deep in the south, and some people use it as a substitute for the French variety.

Planting Artemisia scoparia

Through the forest&Kim Starr, CCBY3.0, we, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=71490446

Longhao is best grown from cuttings. You can also buy plants in your local nursery.

Soil requirements

Artemisia dracunculus is best grown in loamy soil rich in compost, with pH value of 6.3-7.5. It doesn't like thick soil, so if you have thick clay, please add sand and rotten feces. If you have sandy soil, add compost to improve the texture. Artemisia dracunculus needs well drained land.

Solar Requirements

Plant in sunny or partially cool places.

area

Artemisia dracunculus is cold resistant and can be planted in Zone 4-9.

Stem cuttings

To propagate through stem cuttings, place three four inch cuttings in a six inch pot filled with seedling soil mixture. Make sure there are drain holes at the bottom.

Planting tarragon: A complete guide to planting, growing, and harvesting tarragon

Printed by May Vanario

Artemisia dracunculus is a cold resistant perennial herb, which may not be the staple food in the kitchen - but it should be. Planting tarragon is not only one of the easier gardening challenges you can take on, but also has many uses, from kitchen to medicine cabinet.

raised garden bed

It is famous as an ingredient of Dutch sauce and Beianae sauce. The mild and slightly fennel flavor of tarragon leaves will make your recipe even better. It goes well with fish, cheese and egg dishes. Artemisia dracunculus also adds good taste to vegetables such as beans or spinach. The sweet smell is reminiscent of fresh cut hay.

Artemisia dracunculus is called "little dragon" because of its Latin name Medina dragon. The name is believed to come from the shape of the root of Artemisia dracunculus, which is intertwined like a sleeping snake. Artemisia dracunculus is one of the herbs used in Hippocrates and is very common in medieval gardens.

This video cannot be played because of a technical error. (Error code: 102006)

This article will introduce you to planting tarragon and all the reasons why you should not wait to plant it in the herb garden.

Artemisia dracunculus

There are two different types of tarragon. The popular cooking herb is called German or French tarragon. On the other hand, Russian tarragon is not so delicious, but it is a beautiful supplement to the garden.

German and French Artemisia dracunculus

This is the cooking variety used in cooking. Usually, it is called French, but you may also see it called German tarragon. This variety can only grow from cuttings.

If your goal is to use tarragon to make delicious dishes, then this is the right variety for you. French tarragon contains a high level of essential oil, which makes it smell and taste great.

Russian (Artemisia annua)

The leaves of Russian Artemisia dracunculus are coarser and taste less than those of French Artemisia dracunculus. I heard that people say it tastes like grass, which is why many chefs think Russian varieties are not qualified in the kitchen.

On the plus side, it does produce seeds and is easier to reproduce. Russian varieties can be used for medicine. The leaves are light green, with sharp spines and thinner than its popular stepsister Artemisia dracunculus, but it is still a good visual supplement to the vanilla garden.

Mexican tarragon (Tagetes Lucida)

By Dick Calbert from Gibsons, British Columbia, Canada - Tagetes Lucida, sweet marigold, CCBY2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=34450923

Mexican tarragon is part of the marigold family. It is a perennial plant deep in the south, and some people use it as a substitute for the French variety.

Planting Artemisia scoparia

Through the forest&Kim Starr, CCBY3.0, we, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=71490446

Longhao is best grown from cuttings. You can also buy plants in your local nursery.

Soil requirements

Artemisia dracunculus is best grown in loamy soil rich in compost, with pH value of 6.3-7.5. It doesn't like thick soil, so if you have thick clay, please add sand and rotten feces. If you have sandy soil, add compost to improve the texture. Artemisia dracunculus needs well drained land.

Solar Requirements

Plant in sunny or partially cool places.

raised garden bed

area

Artemisia dracunculus is cold resistant and can be planted in Zone 4-9.

Stem cuttings

To propagate through stem cuttings, place three four inch cuttings in a six inch pot filled with seedling soil mixture. Make sure there are drain holes at the bottom.

Humidity is important, so wrap a plastic bag around the flowerpot. Put it on the tray in a warm place.

Rooting

Artemisia dracunculus is very suitable for root cutting as a breeding method. This is a step-by-step method of root propagation

Dig the root cause. This is usually done when the plant is dormant.

Cut the roots about the width and length of the school pencil. You want the length of the insert to be 3-6 inches.

Place the cuttings in the seedling flat ground full of potted soil. You want to place them horizontally in a small ditch 1/2 inch deep.

Spray them with a water bottle and cover them with a plastic cover or glass. You want them to stay moist.

Check them every day to see if they have developed sprouts.

Once they germinate, you can remove the plastic or glass cover, but keep it moist.

When they have grown several buds and root hairs, transplant them.

Grow from seed

You can plant tarragon from the seeds. France and Germany must grow or buy from cuttings.

Sowing starts at the end of spring, earlier than your last expected frost date. The germination rate is very low, so we plan to put four seeds in each pot. Place the seeds on top of the pot soil and gently push them into the soil to provide good contact. You need to cover the seeds lightly and mist to moisten the soil. Plants should begin to appear after 10-12 days.

transplant

There is danger of frost after transplanting tarragon. Keep the soil moist until your herbs are established.

spacing

Select a location that can receive sufficient sunlight and good ventilation. Plants are 18-24 inches apart and 24 inches apart. It is a tall prickly herb that grows to three feet high.

Container growth

Well drained soil is important for this herb, so tarragon is especially good in raised beds or containers.

Take care of tarragon

watering

Don't over water tarragon, because you will cause mildew problems. Once your young plants are established, they don't need much water. In fact, tarragon is a good herb of xerophytes in the southwest. Water only when the soil around the plant is completely dry.

cover

In autumn, put a thick cover around the tarragon plants you grow. This will help them cope with changes in winter temperatures. Covering is particularly important in the northern climate.

trim

Artemisia dracunculus has beautiful and delicate pale green flowers. Pruning will ensure good leaf growth, so trim off sterile flowers when they appear.

divide

Every three to four years, you want to split your plants. Differentiate in early spring. Cut down the older and woodier roots. Keep the smaller roots with buds attached. You can replant them.

Place the plant in a four inch pot with a mixture of seedling soil. Atomize the pot with water and leave it in a cool place for two weeks. At the end of two weeks, check whether root hair has developed. Once they have developed root hair, they can be planted in the garden.

raised garden bed

fertilizer

Most herbs, including tarragon, do not require regular fertilization. In spring, pull back the mulch and add an inch of good compost. Then, carry out 2 or 3 times in the growing season, and give the plants some seaweed extract.

Too much nitrogen will actually reduce the concentration of essential oil and reduce the flavor, so please make sure not to overfertilize.

Problems and Solutions of Artemisia dracunculus Planting

Artemisia dracunculus has few problems and is usually resistant to insects and diseases. In other words, there are several things that need attention. Tarragon rust and white rust

Rust shows yellow or white spots on leaves. It can hinder the growth of plants. Remove infected leaves and prevent them by watering the bottom of the plant in the morning so that the leaves dry during the day.

powdery mildew

Powdery mildew is a white fungus that covers the growing tarragon leaves. Remove and destroy infected leaves and spray plants with fungicides.

Root rot

Artemisia dracunculus can shrink root rot in overwatering or in fungi in soil. Affected plants will have mushy black roots. Remove the plants from the soil, wash the roots and trim away any seriously affected roots. Add new soil to the holes where plants grow and replant.

Companion tarragon factory

Try to plant tarragon with leek and sage because they have similar growth needs. Tarragon can be paired with eggplant to help drive away pests. Most insects don't like the smell. You can also grow tarragon with thyme, tomato and pepper.

Do not plant tarragon with internal organs or artichokes.

Harvesting and storage

You can harvest leaves at any time, but it is ideal to pull off the top of the plant before flowering. This occurred 40-60 days after transplantation.

Cut some springs, wrap a rubber band around the end, and store them in a cool dark place for several days. Keep for up to two weeks in the refrigerator's fresh-keeping box.

Longhao is best used fresh, but it can also be dried and frozen. When drying, air drying is the best. Drying in a dehydrator or oven can reduce the amount of essential oil and thus the flavor.

In medicine, tarragon can treat indigestion, menstrual problems and toothache. It is also a good source of potassium. Pregnant women or lactating women should not take tarragon orally for medicinal purposes.

Cooking with tarragon

Artemisia dracunculus is found in many French cuisines, especially in sauces, chicken, fish and egg dishes.

The tarragon has a light taste. It is particularly effective in vinegar. The production method is as follows:

Harvest some fresh tarragon.

Use the rolling pin to gently roll the leaves to release the essential oil.

Place the leaves in a Mason jar or any decorative jar with a lid.

Pour the white vinegar into the pot until it covers the leaves.

Store in a cool dark place for three weeks.

Use a filter to remove the leaves and leave the vinegar in the jar.

Store on shelves in the pantry for up to six months.

I also like this recipe from Gordan Ramsay mushrooms, leeks and tarragon spaghetti.

This recipe allows you to make an amazing tarragon cream cheese:

Make 1 cup

One 8-ounce cream cheese, room temperature

Lower 1/4 cup chopped dragon

Fresh ground pepper of Artemisia annua

1 slice or onion

Place all ingredients in the bowl of the food processor and stir until fully mixed. Put it in a bowl and enjoy.

If you haven't tried to plant tarragon before, now is the time. It is a carefree herb that allows you to expand your cooking choices.