Vegetable Planting And Soil Temperature on Garden Beds – Ollegardens website

Vegetable Planting And Soil Temperature on Garden Beds

Vegetable seeds and seedlings need the lowest soil temperature to germinate and grow. Seeds and seedlings need the best soil temperature to thrive. The following content also has some reference value for raised garden beds.

Soil temperature not only triggers seed germination, but also is an important factor in soil chemistry. Soil chemistry includes the release (dissolution) of mineral nutrients in soil water. Mineral nutrients are essential for the growth and harvest maturity of vegetable plants.

raised garden bed

The ideal or optimal soil temperature for planting and growing most vegetables is 65 ° to 75 ° F (18 ° - 24 ° C).

Vegetable seeds and seedlings need the lowest soil temperature to germinate and grow. Seeds and seedlings need the best soil temperature to thrive.

Soil temperature not only triggers seed germination, but also is an important factor in soil chemistry. Soil chemistry includes the release (dissolution) of mineral nutrients in soil water. Mineral nutrients are essential for the growth and harvest maturity of vegetable plants.

Measuring soil temperature

Soil temperature can be measured with soil thermometer or instrument. Most home vegetable gardeners use a soil thermometer - a thermometer connected to a metal probe a few inches long, inserted into the soil.

Sowing soil temperature should be between 1 and 3 inches deep. The temperature of the transplanted soil should be 4 to 6 inches deep.

Typically, temperature readings are taken after the thermometer has been placed in the soil for a few minutes.

The soil temperature is best measured in the morning, when the soil is the coolest and has not warmed up in the daytime sunshine.

The soil temperature was measured for at least three consecutive days, and then the results were averaged. Don't rely on just one reading.

Planting and soil temperature

Vegetable seeds can be sown in the garden before the soil warms up to the optimum germination temperature in early spring. If you sow ahead of the ideal temperature, you cannot expect the best germination.

The best temperature for germination and growth may not come until late spring and early summer. In areas with short growing seasons, waiting for the optimal soil temperature may be impractical or realistic. 70% germination rate is generally considered practical and realistic.

You can use the lowest soil temperature for germination and the best soil temperature for germination to determine the soil temperature to start sowing and transplanting.

raised garden bed

Minimum soil temperature for seed sowing and germination:

35 ° F: lettuce, onion, parsnip, spinach.

40 ° F: beets, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, collards, Asian vegetables, Chinese cabbage, broad beans, collards, turnips, mustard, sesame seeds, radishes, Swiss beets, radishes, beans, radishes, turnips.

50 ° F: Asparagus, celery, celery, corn, tomato.

60 ° F: beans, cucumbers, eggplants, melons, peppers, pumpkins, pumpkins, watermelons.

Soil temperature required for 70% germination:

45 ° F: beet, lettuce, parsley, spinach.

50 ° F: Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, collards, Asian vegetables, Chinese cabbage, broad beans, collards, turnips, mustard, sesame seeds, radishes, Swiss beets, radishes, cyanine beans, radishes, turnips.

55 ° F: cabbage, corn, Swiss beet, tomato.

65 ° F: cucumber, pepper.

70 ° F: beans, cantaloupes, melons, pumpkins.

75 ° F: eggplant, okra, pumpkin.

Optimum soil temperature for germination (close to 100% germination):

65 ° F: European parsnip.

70 ° F: Spinach.

75 ° F: Asparagus, lettuce, onion, parsley.

80 ° F: beans, carrots.

85 ° F: beet, cabbage, eggplant, pepper, radish, Swiss beet, tomato, radish.

90 ° F: melon.

95 ° F: corn, cucumber, pumpkin, pumpkin, watermelon.

Feasible soil tests for direct seeding and transplanting:

Before gardens and farms use soil thermometers, a common method of determining when to plant is soil processability. (This is an old way to know when to plant.

If the soil passes the feasible soil test, the soil is workable and can be sown or planted. This is a test: squeeze a handful of soil in the palm of your hand; When you open your hand, if the soil is still wet or very wet, it will not work. Let the soil dry. If the soil breaks from your hands with a touch, it is feasible.

raised garden beds

When the soil is ready to work in spring, you can:

Direct seeding: kale, kale, lettuce, parsnip, pea, radish, turnip, spinach, radish.

Transplanted: Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, onions.

Of course, once the soil can work in spring, it will continue to warm up. Usually, old farmers will look at cloves and other spring flowering plants to decide when to plant them.